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By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
March 27, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Skin Cancer   Melanoma  

Skin Cancer CellOne in five Americans will develop skin cancer at some point in their lives. Skin cancers are generally curable if caught early; however, people who have had skin cancer in the past are at a higher risk of developing a new skin cancer. Regular self-examinations and visits to your dermatologist are imperative to the health of your skin.

The good news is that you can easily protect yourself and your family from skin cancer. If you catch it early enough, as well, it can be successfully treated. Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet rays. The sun is the source for much of this exposure, but can also come from man-made sources, such as indoor tanning lamps.  

Detection and Prevention

It is important to monitor your skin in order to properly detect any signs of skin cancer. The key to detecting skin cancers is to monitor your skin for any changes. Even the slightest change should be taken seriously. When monitoring your skin, look for:

  • Large brown spots with darker speckles located anywhere on the body
  • Dark lesions on the palms of your hands and soles of your feet, fingertips, toes, mouth, nose or genitalia
  • Translucent pearly and dome-shaped growths
  • Existing moles that begin to grow, itch or bleed
  • Brown or black streaks under the nails
  • A sore that repeatedly heals and re-opens
  • Clusters of slow-growing scaly lesions that are pink or red

In addition, the American Academy of Dermatology developed a guide for assessing whether or not a mole or other lesion may become cancerous. This is referred to as the ABCDE guide:

  • Asymmetry
  • Border
  • Color
  • Diameter
  • Elevation

Roughly 90% of non-melanoma cancers are attributed to UV radiation from the sun. Stay out of the sun during peak hours and cover up your arms and legs with protective clothing or sunscreen. Also, check your skin monthly and contact your dermatologist if you notice any changes. If any changes do occur, make an appointment to see your dermatologist immediately. Your dermatologist will be able to assess and diagnose your skin early to begin healing. 

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
February 28, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Dermatitis  

Dermatitis on back and front of handsYour hands look awful—they feel terrible, itch and sting. Sometimes they hurt, or bleed and the itching is driving you nuts! Painful cracks can develop on your fingertips or the backs of your hands, making your daily routine difficult to complete.

You may have tried hydrocortisone, five types of skin moisturizers and changing soaps, all to no avail. Whether you are suffering from an allergic reaction or have been neglecting the health of your hands, there is a solution available to provide relief. By visiting your dermatologist, you can find relief for your painful, itchy hands.

Your Dermatologist Helps to Protect Your Hands from Dermatitis

When it comes to dermatitis, one thing is clear: stop using any harsh soaps to wash your hands—completely. A mild bar soap is better, or, if it is an emergency, you can carry a small bottle of alcohol based hand disinfectant with you. Application of a moisturizer after washing is a good idea. Your dermatologist may also want you to apply a prescription topical steroid cream or ointment.

If you can’t avoid direct contact with irritants at work or at home, your dermatologist may recommend a barrier cream or film for your hands. Bedtime is the perfect opportunity to restore the hands’ natural protective oil layer by applying a heavy moisturizer. It can go right over any medicated cream or ointment being used, and will help the medication penetrate into the skin.

If your hands aren’t improving, even after medication and pampering, contact dermatitis may be considered as a possible diagnosis. Sometimes the cause is easily determined, but patch testing is recommended if the cause is more difficult to discover. Patch tests are performed in your dermatologists’ office to determine what substances are causing your skin rashes. Your dermatologist can then use that information to counsel you on what substances you need to avoid, what products contain those substances and alternative products you may use.

If your hands are giving you trouble, don’t be discouraged. Your dermatologist can help you fight your pain and irritation, whatever the cause!

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
February 02, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Eczema   Dry Skin   Skin Care   Itch  

Eczema is made up of itchy patches of dry skinPracticing a simple skin regimen every day can help keep your skin healthy and more youthful in appearance. If you suffer from eczema or dry skin, with the development of a proper skin care routine from your dermatologist you can easily be on your way to healthier skin. Dry skin is not a serious condition, but it can be uncomfortable and unsightly, turning plump cells into shriveled ones, and creating fine lines and wrinkles. A more serious type of dry skin is eczema, which is a general term for rash-like skin conditions.  

Follow Proper Skin Care Routines from Your Dermatologist

Eczema can’t be cured, but it can be managed. In order to effectively manage your eczema, it is important to avoid the things that trigger your breakouts. Limit your contact with external factors that can irritate your skin and wear gloves to protect the skin on your hands.  

It is critical that basic skin care measures be maintained in order to keep dry skin and eczema under control. Your dermatologist can help you determine a proper skin care routine that will help your condition and continue to keep your skin looking and feeling healthy. Some basic steps may include:

  • Wash your skin twice a day with a gentle non-soap cleanser.
  • Use a moisturizer twice a day.
  • Use a sunscreen every day.
  • Choose makeup that is oil-free and non-comedogenic.
  • Protect your lips with lip block or lipsticks with sunscreen.
  • Avoid long hot showers or baths.

If you suffer from dry skin or eczema, visit your dermatologist today for further diagnosis and treatment. Your dermatologist will be able to set up an effective and appropriate regimen to manage or eliminate your ailments. 

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
January 23, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Eczema  

Those red/orange patches have returned to your hands and elbows. The itchiness bothers you, but you know that if you scratch your skin, ECZEMAyou'll just worsen these scaly areas. What would relieve your eczema? Please consult your dermatologist, Dr. Vernon Thomas Mackey, at Advanced Desert Dermatology. Dr. Mackey diagnoses and treats skin conditions of all kinds, including eczema, in his Peoria, AZ, office. He is an expert on the various types of eczema, their triggers, and how patients just like you can control this chronic skin condition.

The details on eczema

Research indicates that the inflammation, itchiness, burning and raised skin patches common to eczema in Peoria, AZ, stem from auto-immune sources. The National Eczema Association states the 30 million adults and children in the United States suffer with eczema, and yes, it originates in their own bodies, runs in their families, and flares up in response to a wide range of triggers.

Areas behind the knees and on the face, back, elbows and abdomen become inflamed because of an allergic reaction to or contact with certain substances, including:

  • Pet dander or animal proteins (such as dog saliva)
  • Detergents
  • Perfumes
  • Smoke
  • Pollen
  • Fabrics such as wool

They aggravate the two most common forms of eczema: atopic dermatitis and contact dermatitis. Both appear associated with two other autoimmune disorders: asthma and hay fever.

After visual inspection by your dermatologist, he'll likely recommend some common sense treatments for these kinds of eczema, including:

  • No scratching to avoid the itch/scratch cycle
  • Moisturizing creams
  • Topical steroids in severe cases
  • Avoidance of what triggers your symptoms


Other forms of eczema

Another common kind of eczema is dyshidrotic eczema, and it's primarily a women's skin issue. Marked by small, super-itchy, red blisters on the hands and feet, dyshidrotic eczema comes on with stress, moisture on the hands and feet (sweat), and contact with pollen, nickel (jewelry) and cobalt (often found in paint).

Other individuals suffer with lichen simplex  chronicus , an eczema that causes large leathery skin patches. Stress is the major trigger with this skin problem, and medications containing deep moisturizers, zinc, or steroids are the treatment of choice for this stubborn condition.

Finally, nummular (discoid), seborrheic (involving the hair follicles), and stasis eczema (resulting from poor circulation in the extremities) cause varying degrees of itchiness, lesions and

skin breakdown. While all forms of eczema may lead to scarring and skin thickening if untreated, stasis dermatitis may damage the skin extensively, leaving ulcers and infection.

Finding relief for eczema

You can when you consult Dr. Mackey and his team at Advanced Desert Dermatology in Peoria, AZ. Call his office team at (623) 977-6700 to schedule your appointment.

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
January 02, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Wrinkles   Cosmetic Dermatology   Aging  

Woman with and without wrinklesWhile fine lines may be an inevitable fact of life, that doesn’t mean you can’t take steps to improve the health and appearance of your skin. There are a number of simple lifestyle changes you can make to help diminish wrinkles. And with the popularity of cosmetic dermatology, you can talk to your dermatologist about safe and long-lasting procedures, such as Botox™, that help reduce the appearance of wrinkles. 

Visible signs of aging may not be unavoidable, but the causes that lead to wrinkles and fine lines aren’t completely out of your control. The first step to diminishing the appearance of your wrinkles is to understand what causes them in the first place.  

  • Protect your skin from the sun. Sun exposure is the leading cause of wrinkles. When you must be in the sun, always wear sunscreen and protective gear such as a hat and sunglasses. This will not only help you prevent wrinkles, it will also help prevent skin cancer.  
  • Moisturize. Dry skin turns plump skin cells into shriveled ones, creating lines and wrinkles prematurely. Skin that is moist looks better and retains the skin’s elasticity. 
  • Avoid smoking. Smoking causes premature wrinkles and fine lines around the mouth. It upsets the body’s mechanism for breaking down old skin and renewing it. 
  • Wear protective sunglasses. Avoid crow’s feet and prevent wrinkles around your eyes by wearing protective eyewear, as repeated squinting causes these wrinkles.
  • Eat a healthy, well-balanced diet. A diet rich in fruits and vegetables that contain powerful antioxidants, such as berries and leafy greens, can help fight against the harmful molecules that damage skin cells. 
  • Stay hydrated. Water helps keep your body and skin hydrated, giving your skin a radiant glow while helping to rid waste out of your system.  

A More Youthful Appearance with Cosmetic Dermatology

For fast and long-lasting results, you may want to visit your cosmetic dermatologist. Today, cosmetic dermatology offers a wide spectrum of safe and effective procedures that can help you dramatically reduce the visibility of your wrinkles, improve your overall skin health and help you achieve your skin care goals. 

Three popular cosmetic procedures include:

  • Botox™: This popular treatment for facial wrinkles involves injecting Botox™ which relaxes and weakens the muscles beneath the wrinkle. This temporarily prevents the formation of expression type wrinkles, such as frown lines and crow’s feet. 
  • Wrinkle fillers: Popular wrinkle fillers, such as Juvederm™ and Restylane™, are composed of gel-like compounds that reduce the appearance of facial wrinkles and folds. 
  • Chemical Peels: This process involves applying a safe and gentle chemical solution to the skin of the face, neck and hand, which includes exfoliation of the upper skin layers. This procedure is not only used for the reduction of wrinkles but for the treatment of acne and pigmentation problems as well. 

Wrinkles may be a natural part of the aging process, but that doesn’t mean you have to settle for an aged appearance. With a healthy lifestyle, good sun protection and regular visits to your dermatologist, you can help keep your skin looking youthful for years and years. If you are considering treatment for wrinkles, talk to your cosmetic dermatologist about your options.  





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