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Posts for: July, 2017

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
July 24, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: rash  

Almost everyone has experienced a rash at one time or another; that itchy, red patch of skin is unmistakable. However, if rashes keepRash appearing and you're not sure why, seeing a dermatologist is necessary to determine the rash's cause and the appropriate treatment. At Advanced Desert Dermatology in Peoria, AZ, Dr. Vernon Mackey sees many patients with rashes. Below, he discusses some of their common causes.

What is a rash?

A rash is the skin's reaction to a stimulus. It can change the way the skin looks and feels, but it is often reddish or pinkish colored due to increased blood flow to that area. The characteristics of a rash often help your dermatologist determine its cause. For example, the rash associated with measles starts at the head and spreads downward. It is usually flat and red but surrounded by clusters of small papules, or bumps.

Allergies

An allergy is present when the body's immune system overreacts to a normally harmless substance. Food, medication, metals, animal dander and various plants can all cause allergic reactions, and exposure to many of these can cause a rash, which may or may not be itchy, to develop in response. Although there are medications that can help suppress immune reaction, your Peoria dermatologist may suggest avoiding that which triggers your allergies as the most reliable solution.

Side effects

Rashes can also develop as a side effect to certain medications. This is a common occurrence when taking steroids; it often appears as an all-over reddening of the face. There are antibiotics that can also make the skin extremely sensitive to sunlight, increasing the likelihood of a severe sunburn.

Other causes

Numerous other things can cause rashes: chafing, psoriasis or eczema, even pregnancy. Some people break out in a rash when they're nervous or anxious. The good news is that a quick consultation with your dermatologist can help diagnose most of these causes and they can be easily treated.

The best way to determine what's causing your rash is to contact Advanced Desert Dermatology in Peoria, AZ to schedule an appointment with Dr. Mackey. Call our office today to get scheduled!


By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
July 05, 2017
Category: Skin Care

SunburnsYour skin is your body's most prominent organ, making it essential to properly care for it, especially during the summertime when UV levels can wreak havoc on exposed skin. While basking in the sun can feel sensational, the effects of sun exposure may not be as agreeable over time. When you decide to hit up the beach in your new swimsuit, your dermatologist urges you to take extra precautions to protect your skin.

Many beach and pool goers often complain of sunburn, which is a visible reaction of the skin’s exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the invisible rays that are part of sunlight. Signs of sunburn may not appear for a few hours and the full effect to your skin may take up to 24 hours to appear, but when you have a sunburn, you will know it! Ultraviolet rays can also cause invisible damage to the skin. Excessive or multiple sunburns cause premature aging of the skin and can lead to skin cancer. According to your dermatologist, some of the most common symptoms of sunburn include:

  • Redness
  • Swelling of the skin
  • Pain
  • Blisters
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Weakness
  • Dry, itching and peeling skin days after the burn

Sunburns typically heal on their own in a couple of weeks, but there are ways to alleviate the pain caused by them. It is often recommended that you take a cool bath or gently apply cool, wet compresses to the skin when sunburn develops. You many also take a pain reliever to help with the pain, but it is also important to rehydrate your skin to help reduce swelling by applying aloe.  

Visit your dermatologist for more information on how to protect your skin this summer and to find out what to do when you suffer from sunburn. Remember, skin cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in the United States, so protecting your skin this summer can help protect you for a lifetime.