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By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
April 16, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: rash  

Do you want to know more about rashes and how each case is treated?

Rashes are skin conditions on the skin that manifest in a variety of ways: red patch, small bumps or blisters. Rashes are not life-Rashthreatening and are treated with the help of your Peoria, AZ, doctor Dr. Vernon Mackey. Learn more about the different types of rashes and treatments, like over-the-counter anti-itch creams, antihistamines and moisturizing lotions.

More About Rashes

  • A common type of eczema is Atopic Dermatitis.
  • There is Contact dermatitis which is a type of eczema caused by an allergen.
  • There are several chronic skin problems: acne, psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis.
  • There are fungal infections, like ringworms and yeast infections
  • There are viral Infections, like shingles.

The American Academy of Dermatology Association gives a list of other types of rashes.

Below is a list:

  • Lichen planus: This rash manifests on several parts of the body, like inside the mouth, genitals and scalp but aren't contagious.
     
  • Granuloma: This is a type of cancer that causes a rash and manifests in a variety of appearances on skin: a slightly raised and ringed patch usually found on one's hand, arm, foot or leg; patches all over one's body; a deep, round lump in one's skin that may be mistaken for ringworm. Contact your Peoria dermatologist because they can differentiate between the two.
  • Lupus: There are several types of lupus: cutaneous only affects skin and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) which affects the body's skin, joints and lungs.

Do you need a consultation?

For more information on rashes in Peoria, AZ, contact Advanced Desert Dermatology at (623) 977-6700 today!

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
April 04, 2019
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Acne  

Discover helpful acne-fighting tips and trick to achieve clearer skin.

You’re trying to find the right way to get your acne under control, right? Well, there are certainly so many options out there that it can be a bit daunting. First and foremost, if you are just starting to deal with acne then you may want to tackle the issue from the comfort of your own home before turning to a dermatologist for help.

At-Home Treatment Options

The first line of defense is usually to try an over-the-counter acne cleanser or topical cream that contains an active ingredient such as benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. It’s important to be patient when it comes to seeing results. No acne product will work overnight. In fact, it can take anywhere from 4-6 weeks of consistent use before you start to notice results from commercial acne products, so don’t give up on a product too soon.

Other tips to follow include:

  • Cleaning your smartphone with disinfectant wipes at lease once a day (imagine just how much bacteria your phone picks up everyday).
  • Washing your face twice a day, once in the morning and at night before bedtime, and immediately after sweating.
  • Being gentle with your skin. Harsh scrubs and being aggressive won’t get rid of acne; it will actually just make it worse.
  • Using cosmetic products that won’t clog pores (look for words like “non-comedogenic” or “oil free”)
  • Leaving acne alone (do not pick acne or try to extract it yourself, as this can lead to scarring)
  • Washing pillowcases regularly to get rid of pore-clogging bacteria

When to See a Dermatologist

If you are having trouble getting your acne under control after weeks of trial and error, or if your acne is severe and painful then it’s time to enlist the help of a dermatologist who will be able to provide you with more effective strategies for getting rid of your acne. After all, there are different things that can cause acne and it’s important that your skin doctor figures out what’s causing your acne so that they can create the right treatment plan for you.

Dermatologist-Approved Acne Treatment Options

Depending on what’s causing your breakouts, a dermatologist may recommend these treatment options:

  • Topical treatment: Prescription-strength cleansers, ointments, and creams containing glycolic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and retinoids can target and eliminate acne.
  • Topical or oral antibiotics: Antibiotics can reduce inflammation and kill the bacteria responsible for acne.
  • Oral contraceptives: If you are dealing with breakouts that occur around your menstrual cycle then hormonal fluctuations could be causing your acne. There are certain types of birth control pills that have been FDA approved to fight acne.
  • Isotretinoin: More commonly referred to as Accutane, this powerful oral medication is used for those dealing with severe cystic acne that can lead to deep scarring. This is often recommended when other treatment options haven’t been effective.

Have questions about getting your acne under control? Then it’s time to consult with a dermatologist.

By Advanced Desert Dermatology
March 05, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Psoriasis  

What is Psoriasis?

Have you been experiencing bumpy, white-scale-topped patches of red skin erupting over certain parts of your body? These itchy, sometimes painful plaques could be the result of an undiagnosed case of psoriasis. Although this skin disorder does not have a cure, there are several treatment options that can lead to Psoriasis are itchy, painful plaques that appear on the skin.symptom relief. Read on to learn more about psoriasis and how your local dermatologist can help!

The Background on Psoriasis

While there is no medical consensus on what exactly causes psoriasis, experts generally point towards an abnormality in how T cells operate in a patient’s immune system. T cells are normally used by the body in order to defend against foreign threats, such as viruses or bacteria. However, for those with psoriasis, these cells become overactive and start to treat healthy skin cells as if they were harmful. In turn, this leads the body to behave as if it had a wound to heal, or an infection to fight. As a result, sporadic patches of irritated skin begin to erupt on certain parts of the body.

Both the appearance of these symptoms and the level of their severity can be triggered through a number of factors, including:

  • Skin infections
  • Skin injuries
  • Heavy stress
  • Regular tobacco use
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Use of specific medications, such as lithium, beta blockers, antimalarial drugs, and iodides

Treatment Options

Although there is no cure for the disorder, your local dermatologist has a number of treatment methods that can slow down the growth of skin cells responsible for psoriasis’ uncomfortable rashes. An appointment with your skin doctor can determine which of these options is right for you:

  • Steroid cream
  • Moisturizer
  • Coal tar (available in lotions, creams, foams, soaps, and shampoos)
  • Ultraviolet therapy
  • Retinoid (not recommended for women who are pregnant or plan on becoming pregnant)
  • Methotrexate (only for serious cases)

Need Relief? Give Us a Call!

You don’t need to live with the full discomfort of psoriasis; give our office a call today and discover how we can help!

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
February 28, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: rash  

Noticing a rash is sometimes an alarming experience, especially if you are unsure of its cause. Though these irritating conditions are Rashusually nothing to worry about, they can sometimes indicate an underlying condition or allergy. Find out more about rashes, different types of skin irritations, and what they mean for you by reading below, and if you require personal care for a rash or other skin condition, contact Dr. Vernon Mackey at Advanced Desert Dermatology in Peoria, AZ, today!

Types of Rashes
From allergic reactions to eczema, rashes can come from many different sources, some innocuous, others rather harmful. Knowing the kind of rash you are experiencing and how to handle it can help you determine whether or not you should see your doctor:

  • Eczema: Eczema causes yellow or white scaly patches of skin. They are often red, oily, raised, and hair loss causing.
  • Impetigo: This contagious bacterial infection causes fluid-filled sores and a crusty rash.
  • Allergic reaction: An allergic reaction often comes in the form of hives, which are large red welts on the skin. Certain foods, contact with a certain substance, or even seasonal allergies can cause hives.
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease: Most common in children under five, this condition causes red blisters on the hands, feet, and mouth.
  • Psoriasis: Psoriasis causes silvery, scaly patches of skin and is commonly found on the scalp, elbows, and knees.
  • Chickenpox: This childhood illness causes clusters of fluid-filled, itchy blisters all over the body, and it is contagious until the blisters have crusted over.

When should I see my doctor?
Often, rashes are nothing to worry about and will go away on their own in just a day or two. However, if your rash becomes severe, begins affecting your daily life, or comes with a fever, you should come visit our Peoria office. Additionally, if the rash is all over the body or comes on suddenly, you should seek medical attention.

Concerned? Call today!
Your doctor can help you determine if your rash is a health risk or simply an irritation. Find out more about your rash and its treatments with Dr. Vernon Mackey at Advanced Desert Dermatology in Peoria, AZ. Call (623) 977-6700 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Mackey today!

By ADVANCED DESERT DERMATOLOGY
February 01, 2019
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Keratosis Pilaris  

Keratosis Pilaris can cause bumps on your armsCould those rough, white bumps actually be Keratosis Pilaris?

If you are dealing with rough patches of skin on your body, then you may be dealing with a condition known as keratosis pilaris. While this is a fairly common and non­threatening dermatological issue it can be hard to effectively treat. Luckily, most cases of keratosis pilaris go away by the age of 30. However, find out everything you need to know about this condition and how to manage your symptoms properly.

Are you noticing any of these symptoms?

  • Rough, scaly patches that are sometimes itchy
  • White or red bumps that look like acne
  • Bumps on the arms, legs, cheeks or butt
  • An increase in symptoms during the winter

If you’ve said “yes” to any of these symptoms above, then your bumps may be the result of keratosis pilaris. Luckily, this isn’t a serious condition and often won’t require treatment. However, some people feel embarrassed by how their skin looks. If this is the case, then consult your dermatologist.

Keratosis Pilaris Treatments

There is no one treatment that effectively helps those with keratosis pilaris. However, your dermatologist might recommend a medicated exfoliant, a retinoid cream or gel, or laser treatment. While using these medications may improve the look of your skin, if you stop taking this medication there is a significant chance that the problem will return. The biggest issue with this dermatological condition is that it lasts for many years.

Self­Care Measures for Keratosis Pilaris

While your treatment options might not sound ideal, there are also some easy things you can do at home that can improve the look of your skin.

  • Avoid scrubbing or rubbing your skin, which can further aggravate your condition.
  • Always pat your skin dry and never rub. This will also help to maintain moisture.Apply a moisturizer after getting out of the shower. This can further help to improve the appearance of dry, irritated skin.
  • Look for products with urea or lactic acid. Both of these ingredients can be found in over-the­counter skin care products and they remove excess keratin from the outermost layer of the skin.

Talk to your dermatologist about which prescription medications and lifestyle changes would improve your condition. Even though this condition isn’t serious you can still seek medical advice and treatments to help with your problem.





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